Overview Coaches Staff Parents

Rationale

HYS Jr. Academy has adopted US Youth Soccer's Player Development Model, which provides a curriculum that serves as a standard to guide its affiliated organizations on how to effectively train athletes of all levels and abilities. The following is an outline of each stage of development to better understand our program's goals and methods.

Above all else, our primary goal is to make sure that every child has fun.

Individual - Me and My Ball

Our developmental soccer program for preschool and kindergarteners is designed to help children learn elementary movement skills by building overall motor skills in a fun-filled, active environment. Children are separated by school grade and randomly placed into coed training groups that meet once a week for a 45-minute training session led by volunteer coaches. These training sessions consist of free play, game-like activities and small-sided practice games.

The emphasis of our program at this stage is on letting the children play.

General Characteristics

  • Catching skill not yet developed.
  • Constantly in motion - love to run, jump, roll and climb.
  • Eye-hand and/or eye-foot coordination is primitive at best - not ready for bouncing or flighted balls yet.
  • No sense of pace - go flat out.
  • Physical coordination is immature - can balance on dominant foot.
  • Controlling the ball is a complex task.
  • Prefer large soft balls and foam balls.
  • Only understand simple rules.
  • Individual oriented (me, my, mine) - little or no concern for team activities.
  • Believes in Santa Claus, but will not discuss with peers - lofty imagination.
  • Physical and psychological development of boys and girls is quite similar.
  • Psychologically, easily bruised - need generous praise.
  • Short attention span - tends to one task at a time.
  • Limited understanding of time and space.

Components of the Game

Physical: Introduce the idea of how to warm-up and movement education. Begin education of nutrition with players and parents. Balance, walking, running, how to start and stop, jumping, hopping, rolling skipping, changing direction, bending, twisting and reaching.

Technical: Dribbling (stop and start) and shooting. Experiment with the qualities of a rolling ball.

Psycho-Social: Sharing, fair play, parental involvement, “how to play” and emotional management.

Tactical: Where is the field? The concept of boundary lines, at which goal to shoot and playing with the ball wherever it may go.

Typical Training Session

  • Free play or a warm-up, including movement education challenges and soccernastics.
    (approximately 15 minutes)
  • Game-like activities, mostly body awareness and maze games.
    (approximately 15 minutes)
  • Finish with a 4v4 practice game with two goals, no goalkeepers.
    (approximately 15 minutes)

Me, the Ball and My Friend

Our developmental soccer program for first and second graders is designed to help children learn basic movement skills by building overall motor skills in a fun-filled, active environment. Children are separated by school grade and randomly placed into coed training groups that meet once a week for a 60-minute training session led by volunteer coaches. These training sessions consist of free play, individual and partner game-like activities and small-sided practice games.

The emphasis of our program at this stage is on igniting a lifelong passion for the game.

General Characteristics

  • Like to show skills - need approval.
  • Beginning to develop some physical confidence (most can ride a bicycle).
  • Lack a sense of pace - go flat out, chasing the ball until they drop.
  • Still in motion - twitching, jerking, scratching and blinking are all second nature physical movements.
  • Still into running, jumping, climbing and rolling.
  • Boys and girls are still quite similar in physical and psychological development.
  • Attention span is a bit longer than the Pre K and Kindergarten group.
  • Developing playmates.
  • Still very sensitive - dislike personal failure in front of peers, making ridicule from the facilitator in front of the group very destructive.
  • Still do not believe in the intensity of the team at all costs.
  • Inclined more toward small group activities.

Components of the Game

Technical: Experiment with the qualities of a rolling or spinning ball. Introduce ball lifting, juggling, block tackle, receiving ground balls with the inside and sole of the foot, shooting with the inside of the foot, toe passing and shooting and dribbling while changing direction. Introduce the push pass.

Physical: Agility, eye-foot and eye-hand coordination, balance, leaping, bounding, tumbling, catching, throwing, pulling, pushing, warm-up activities and movement education. Continue education on sports nutrition with players and parents.

Psycho-Social: Encourage working in pairs, sportsmanship, parental involvement, how to play, emotional management, creativity, dynamic activities, participation of all players and a safe and fun environment. There is still a short attention span unless the player has peaked (keep interest high). Like to show what they can do – encourage trying new things. Developing self-esteem – activities should foster positive feedback and attainable positive success.

Tactical: Back line and forward line, 1v1 attack and choosing to dribble or pass. Introduce the names of positions (fullbacks and forwards). Institute games of 2v1, 1v2 and 2v2, playing with the ball with a purpose and promote problem solving.

Typical Training Session

  • Free play or a warm-up, each player with a ball, dynamic stretching and soccernastics.
    (approximately 15 minutes)
  • A mixture of individual and partner activities. Add more maze-type games. Introduce target games with a variety of player combinations: 1v1, 2v1, 1v2 and 2v2.
    (approximately 25 minutes)
  • Conclude with a small-sided practice game of 4v4, two goals and no goalkeepers.
    (approximately 20 minutes)